Class, race, and labor
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Class, race, and labor working-class consciousness in Detroit by John C. Leggett

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Published by Oxford University Press in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Working class -- Michigan -- Detroit.,
  • Social conflict -- Michigan -- Detroit.,
  • Class consciousness -- Michigan -- Detroit.,
  • Detroit (Mich.) -- Race relations.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 228-238.

Statement[by] John C. Leggett.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD8085.D6 L4
The Physical Object
Paginationxvii, 252 p.
Number of Pages252
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17758068M

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