Contract farming and outgrower schemes in Swaziland
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Contract farming and outgrower schemes in Swaziland lessons from Vuvulane irrigated farms and Mphetseni pineapple settlement scheme by Franneke C. C. M. Boeren

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Published by University of Swaziland, Social Science Research Unit in Kwaluseni [Swaziland] .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Swaziland

Subjects:

  • Contracts, Agricultural -- Swaziland -- Case studies.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementFranneke C.C.M. Boeren & Vincent Majozi Sithole.
SeriesResearch paper / Social Science Research Unit, University of Swaziland ;, no. 25., Research paper (University of Swaziland. Social Science Research Unit) ;, no. 25.
ContributionsSithole, Vincent.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD2132.5 .B64 1989
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 97 p. ;
Number of Pages97
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2024386M
LC Control Number90980437

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The paper argues that contract farming and outgrower schemes are\ud best understood in the context of the social relations to which this\ud form of capitalist development in agriculture gives rise. Such schemes\ud have differentiating effects and create the conditions for the\ud reproduction of a middle peasantry, as well as the potential for Author: Richard Levin.   Out-grower schemes and contract farming often exclude precisely the groups that ActionAid works with most: the poor, women, the landless, and marginal or subsistence farmers. Out-grower schemes offer access to land that would not otherwise be available to a company and can also be a disguised form of land grab. Abstract This article examines the experience of seven countries in East and Southern Africa with contract farming and outgrower schemes. In such schemes, farmers sell their crops under contract to private or public enterprises for processing or export in Cited by: This article examines the experience of seven countries in East and Southern Africa with contract farming and outgrower schemes, based on conclusions from a three-year study of the organization and performance of contract farming (CF) and outgrower-schemes (OGS) in Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Lesotho, Swaziland and Malawi. Summaries of each country study, plus a version of this .

in these contract farming schemes (Glover 19 94, Silva ). Hence, for the practical purposes contract farming applications can be classified into two broad. recommended practices provided by THE COMPANY and the Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security. 4. To sell ll of the cropa to THE COMPANY that the OUTGROWER produces. General Conditions: 1. In the event that the OUTGROWER bringing for sale paprika or birds eye chillies which are WET, MIXED GRADES, POORLY HANDLED OR of OTHERWISE REDUCED. • Examples of outgrower schemes • Characterization of outgrower schemes • Lessons learned • Outgrower best practices Contract Farming • Large-scale (commercial) and/or smallholder farmers • Agreement between farmer and private agribusiness processing/marketing company • Range of activities (services) to secure access to produce. Contract farming, in conjunction with capacity building and training, are the most common types of outgrower schemes in Southern and East Africa, though this is not the case in West Africa.

Downloadable! This article examines the experience of seven countries in East and Southern Africa with contract farming and outgrower schemes. In such schemes, farmers sell their crops under contract to private or public enterprises for processing or export in return for various price guarantees, inputs and services. The article identifies some of the key determinants of success or failure. (4) To sell all green beans of acceptable quality grown on the farm to the Company, for the price and following the procedure outlined in para 4 below. (5) To become a member of .. Farmers' Group, and to contribute to the maintenance of common facilities for irrigation, input distribution, sorting, packing etc as agreed by the group.   1. Introduction. Contract farming (CF) has become an increasingly popular institutional tool to ensure the quality and quantity of inputs or raw materials for processors, exporters, distributors, and supermarkets (Reardon et al., , Swinnen and Maertens, ).At the same time, CF may help farmers overcome production constraints, such as financial constraints, poor access to inputs, or lack. ‘living under contract’ have also been challenged (Little and Watts ). In addition to the plantation or estate, and outgrower and contract farming models that have been widely discussed in the literature over decades, there is a third form of commer-cial agriculture worthy of attention. Small- and medium-scale commercial farming by inde-.